17 Comments

    • That’s brilliant. Your dogs get good treatment. I think I’ve seen this. I have to make sure there’s no potato starch in it. But it is just cool to know how and why things work and then tweak them. Thanks, Jovina. Have a great weekend!

  1. Very cool information about all the different flours! One of the biggest reasons I have resisted the gluten-free thing is that I love to bake so much, and I am worried baking with gluten-free flours will not yield good results. But your tutorial gives me hope that it is possible, with some trial and error, and I do love to experiment….also, I wonder if even mixing all-purpose flour with some of the gluten-free ones would be interesting, so it’s not completely gluten-free, but with less gluten. Congratulations to you and your husband for getting his cholesterol numbers down without medication! And good luck on your run!! My husband also read Eat and Run and enjoyed it. The running culture is a unique, crazy and fun one! 🙂

    • Thanks so much, Jenny. I hear you. My banking definitely hit a learning curve. It’s sad when your husband says, “can you just make the old waffles again like you used to?” But now I have this. I think it’s the solution. I’ll see what needs to be tweaked or left out and I think I’m back. I do like the idea of adding regular Ap for a little gluten. I think it could work. Yes re running culture. Funny that I’m like a combo of you and your husband with these new interests. Have a great weekend!

  2. i’m so glad that your husband’s #s have leveled out, that is great news. i received some ick news a few months ago about my own health and while i have not reached any kind of dramatic levels, i sure wish i had the same kind of zeal to alter my diet like you have!

    • Thanks, Lan. I think the zeal came out of tribute to our friend. You have run races and tried whole 30 so you have some zeal there too. IM swooning over your moonpies BTW. Swoooooning.

  3. Oh wow, I am so so happy A.’s results are good. I am proud of you both, and I hope he now sees how useful and worthwhile it was to make all those changes in your diet. And this was only the beginning of a new food adventure for the two of you; there is so much more to explore! I love that you still treat yourselves to restaurants and things you like eating, so this new way of life isn’t one of deprivation. Keep it up!
    That being said, I have not had much success with GF baking, whether breads or crusts – before I moved I even sold most of my gluten free oriented cookbooks, as I wasn’t making any of the recipes. The trouble is I have not been able to replicate the texture of what I get with wheat flour, and I often find the taste of GF flours too strong, too heavy, and the texture either crumbly or sticky. Maybe I haven’t tried the right recipes!
    I like oat, millet, and buckwheat in small quantities, alongside regular flour or in specific recipes calling for those flours (buckwheat crêpes, pakora batter, socca, etc.). I do use a lot of whole grain flours such as spelt, einkorn, rye… which contain gluten, but also sparingly and often mixed with wheat flour (local and/or organic though…).
    You make me want to give it another try some day; you’ve really researched the question, and it seems you are enjoying yourself alot! Who knows, maybe I’ll end up enjoying the adventure too some day!

    • Thanks so much, Darya. We are trying not to be dogmatic about it but we’ve been having fun. I think I stumbled upon a very good waffle recipe with this and also a quick bread. I would be scared to try it in a loaf, but I think as you said, a combo with some glutenous flours would work. I like using full on chickpea flour alone in socca. Though you are right, the flavors can be strong. I think between rice, sorgham, oat and tapioca are easy in terms of flavor. But the textures vary. Aside from the banking though, it’s been a fun journey. The opposite of depravation… Abundance. Last night Alex went out drinking and ordered a portobello burger and tried to convert his friend!

      • Haha! Alex converting a friend to portobello burgers is something I would love to see. It’s like Pierre drooling at the idea of steak, but no longer being able to handle a barbeque, and spending the summer eating tomatoes and eggplant! I would definitely use chickpea flour only in socca, but maybe not in breads! But I need to start experimenting, I bet I would at least enjoy the journey, if not the result. (I have tons of news, more in an email when I process the novelty of everything falling upon me since Monday).

  4. I remember hearing a radio programme about flours that people used to eat before we bred a style of wheat that was white with all the goodness missing. I can see you opening a wholefoods shop or restaurant as well as writing a best selling book.
    Good luck with the race next week!

  5. Hey congratulations to getting your husbands cholesterol down! You need to give me tips, the truth is that I have slightly high colesterol too, over the limit (which I think is because I’m half Asian, Asians have more). Even though the doctor hasn’t wanted to put me on medication yet, but I’m trying to slowly work towards eating more vegetables, legumes, more exercise, and less meat. So my question to you, is just how strict did you make this diet? As in is he now a vegetarian or not? Etc.
    I’m excited and nervous for you about your race. You are one brave woman doing that, in the dark (ok, with head lamp and other people around I suppose), but still very brave nevertheless. I reached 10km today!!! And am knackered. I thought I have to tell you, lol. Next month in theory I should be doing a 10km race in Valencia with a friend of mine, last year I nearly died doing the 5km, so hey this is progress. Also, my goal was to be able to run 10km by the end of the year, and I’ve reached it so I’m so happy. Best of luck with your incredible race next week! Continue practicing! xxx

    • Thank you for your thoughtful comment. I have a lot of thoughts on this and will write to you more fully soon. Go you with your 8km!!? Keep it up! In short he didn’t go completely plant based, but cut out a lot of cheese, burgers, wheat pasta and fruit juices. Little by little. He added a ton of oatmeal and vegetables, legumes and fruit. More soon. Xoxo

  6. I adore and applause your effort to make your diet healthier – and yes, it kinda helps, doesn´t it? It´s great you two were ambitious enough to try to get along without medication, and what a success it´s possible! For many others, it´s not as I can tell you from a professional point of view. I´m happy for every single one who gets well without prescriptions (though statins are far better than their reputation). Stay fit and keep cooking the way you do! As always great to read from you, SAbine

  7. Hooray for your husband’s good results and I’m so pleased he could achieve it through diet! That is wonderful news. Your GF flour info here is brilliant – thank you. I do some GF baking but haven’t found a flour blend I like so can’t wait to try yours. I’ve been making a really good vegan GF pumpkin oat cookie and no one can tell it isn’t a traditional cookie with eggs and AP flour (recipe from Love & Lemons). I do love the flavors of oat and buckwheat flours. I just had a divine cookie from a bakery that was made from buckwheat, butter, salt and sugar…I need to try and replicate soon!

    • Aww. Thank you, Hannah! We’re so glad too. Just a little awareness goes a long way. Those pumpkin cookies sound amazing. There’s a chocolate GF cookie I love from a bakery near me. It’s amazing that there isn’t a proliferation of really good GF recipes. I’m looking forward to reading Bojon Gourmet’s new Alternate Flour book and a few others, but it all seems so novel though it shouldn’t be. I’ll definitely get to posting soon. Thanks for your thoughtful comment as always.

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